09 May 2018


Lecture Theatre 21, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Sheffield, UK

The MAPP Lecture Series began in November 2017 with a lecture by Prof. Richard Leach, University of Nottingham, and will continue in Sheffield in 2018 with regular one-hour lunchtime lectures, from experts in the field of AM. All lectures are open to external attendees, and will be followed by lunch and an opportunity to speak with the lecturer.

The third lecture in the series will be given on 9th May 2018, by Dr Kate Black, University of Liverpool.

Dr Kate Black
Dr Kate Black

Broadening the materials pallet for Additive Manufacturing

One of the main challenges in the field of AM is the limited pallet of materials we have available to us.   While it is currently possible to create industrial AM products out of metals and plastics, the range of materials is still limited and needs expanding and optimising.  One way of expanding these materials is to employ an inter-disciplinary approach whereby we combine methodologies from the world of chemistry and material science to develop a series of novel reactive starting materials.  This talk will explore the use of Reactive Organometallic (ROM) precursors to produce materials spanning metals, oxides and nitrides, which can be processed to print novel functional 2D and 3D materials. 

Dr Kate Black gained her PhD in Material Science at the University of Liverpool in 2008. She then went on to join the University of Cambridge as a Research Associate in the Centre for Advance Photonic and Electronics, principally working on the development of novel materials for supercapacitors. In 2013 Kate became a Lecturer in the Centre for Materials and Structures at the University of Liverpool, School of Engineering. Kate’s research interests are primarily focused on the development of novel functional materials, using inkjet printing, for the manufacture of electronic and optoelectronic devices. Her main area of expertise is in the development of novel Reactive Organo-Metallic inks (ROM) which are particle-free and can be exploited to produce a wide a variety of functional materials, such as conductors, insulators and semiconductors.